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Tag Archives | Advice

Scott Dubar’s Tips for 365 Drawing Challenges

Scott Dubar posted his top 5 tips back in April on how to complete a 365 day drawing challenge after completing one himself. For most I’d assume it sounds like an impossible task especially when you’ve got impending deadlines and what not, but with Scott’s tips you’ll be well on your way to becoming the quick-thinking illustrator you always wanted to be.

Visit: http://scottdubar.com/tips/…365-drawing-challenge/

If you do start one yourself or have done one, we’d love to check it. Send us an email or message with a link.

Illustrator Meet Ups & Gatherings

We love meeting new people and we know no matter how much you hate being out in public, that human connection is what stops us from turning into complete recluses. So while you may be happy to be locked in your own echo chamber, once in a while you ought to get a bit of fresh air… If not for yourself, do it for the rest of us before you figure out how to destroy the planet with a flick of a switch or worst still you become one of those truly twisted fine artists.

So now that you’ve finished deciphering the mysteries of the world with your cat or dog and wondering why the only person you ever talk to is your mother, check out these two events that are definitely worth more than a passing glance.

First up we have Yo Illo on the 25th January at The Miller Pub in London, followed by Drink and Draw on the 28th at The Edwardian Tearooms in Birmingham. Yo Illo is for everyone from students to seasoned professionals and is a good chance to talk about work and let off steam. Drink and Draw is more of a chance to socialise while doing what you love with the freely provided paper and pencils. Both events are run and supported by people who love the creative industry, so whether you go to both, or one or the other, it’ll be an amazing evening and atmosphere.

Yo Illo’s January Meetup
No agenda, no pressure — like-minded illustrators and industry talk.
Wednesday, January 25 at 6 PM – 9 PM
The Miller Pub
96 Snowsfields, SE1 3 London, United Kingdom
facebook.com/events/671989512981860/

Drink and Draw at the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery
A night of tiddly scribblings! Pens, pencils and paper provided!!
Saturday, January 28 at 6:30 PM – 10:30 PM
The Edwardian Tearooms
Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, B3 3DH Birmingham
facebook.com/events/240459886365725/

So you want to be an illustrator?!

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The LCS isn’t the bustling creative web portal it once was due to the sudden and all engulfing rise of social networks like Facebook and Twitter. However, we still keep an eye on things and occasionally post an article or run the odd art related project (like Mail Me Art) when we get the chance. But when it comes to career-related and general advice, our new home for publishing these sort of articles is the HAI Staff Blog. We try to write and publish them when we can, but there are only so many hours in a day, as every self-employed person knows. Here is a list of all the freelance illustration advice riddled articles you may have missed over the last year.

Lots of people want to become or train to be illustrators. Some people take up the trade because they have a natural talent and others end up as artists because their mothers incessantly told them how good they were and they started to believe it! However you became or will become an illustrator, we’ve all got to start somewhere. As we live in a multimedia-rich world these days, it’s never been easier to find information and advice about the industry we all love.

Become an ArtPACT patreon

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ArtPACT has been free for a while now and was running on general donations, but there weren’t enough to maintain the service. Sadly, it was announced a couple of weeks ago that they were giving up the ghost and closing down. This announcement managed to light a fire under enough people’s butts to kickstart their Patreon campaign and breath new life into the service. They’re looking to reach a minimum of $250 per month to keep their excellent service going, so if you can spare anything to help them out, I’m sure it’d be appreciated. https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3802975

ArtPACT is a free online resource for illustrators focusing on the fantasy, sci-fi, horror, and comic book genres. The ArtPACT website has information for artists of all experience levels regarding contracts, copyrights, and alternative income solutions.” – Jim Pavelec

Finding your niche!

It’s all well and good telling people you’re a Jack of all trades… if you’re a handyman. But even if a client doesn’t have a specific style in mind, you’re not going to stand out from the crowd. Not being able to show people that special thing you do means you’re not special at all, or to finish the saying… a master of none.

Judge Dredd - The Natural ©Rebellion

Judge Dredd – The Natural © Rebellion

I’m not saying people shouldn’t expand their horizons, it is just that it takes time to build a business and you shouldn’t run before you can walk. Illustrators should find something that they’re really good at and make sure any potential client knows it. You want to pigeonhole yourself and make sure you’re the go-to guy for something specific. Deciding to play to your strengths doesn’t necessarily guarantee work, but it does mean you’re competing for clients in a smaller field with less competition. By narrowing your market you’re actually making more work available to yourself and not less.

Where's Stig? The World Tour - BBC Books

Where’s Stig? The World Tour – BBC Books

For example if someone’s looking for an animator, they’re going to hire an animator and not a children’s illustrator who dabbles in animation. The Jack of all trades might not even be on the client’s radar if they’re not specified what they specialise in for the sake of wanting to not miss out on a job. The same goes for comic book artists – if that’s what you do, that’s what you should call yourself. People will hire comic artists for more than graphic novels and comics, but they tend not to hire people for comic work if they’re not a ‘comic book artist’. Also as far as I know, specialists or people who work in a niche market tend to get paid more too. Have a look at successful illustrators, I’m pretty sure you’ll agree the common thread is that they all have a specific style and that they tend to work for similar clients and do variations of the same kind of job, time and time again. There are exceptions to the rule, but not everyone can be Damien Hirst.

Find your thing and make it yours! The world is your oyster.

Artist Credits…
Judge Dredd / Graeme Neil Reid / http://illo.cc/528
Where’s Stig? / Rod Hunt / http://illo.cc/9747

Art Business Bootcamp with Marc & Lauren

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Marc Scheff and AD Lauren Panepinto of Drawn + Drafted and Dear AD are now accepting sign ups for their Art Business BootCamp! It looks like it’s going to be a fantastic program with invaluable advice for professional freelance illustrators of all levels. Registration closes on the 30th November.

An art career is about more than just making art, it’s about creating a successful business around that work. But the landscape is foggy. There’s no single path. Success looks different for everyone, and we often feel like we’re just spinning our wheels. It can be confusing and emotionally draining. We’ve been there… – Marc & Lauren

You can find out more about the bootcamp at artbusinessbootcamp.com or you can SIGN UP NOW and invest in your future today.

Lizzie Mary Cullen: Late Paying Clients Can Ruin Illustration Businesses

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Lizzie Mary Cullen has just had a well said rant about clients paying their invoices late or not at all, and how it is much more than just an inconvenience. If you commission illustrators, please pay attention and have a read. You hire them because you love what they do, so please show them enough respect to pay them on time.

Read: How a Late Paying Client Can Ruin a Freelance Business

How to Hire a Children’s Illustrator

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If you’ve written a manuscript or are planning on writing a children’s book, there’s a very handy FAQ over on the Hire an Illustrator staff blog. It covers everything from whether you should actually be hiring an illustrator or not and how much it’s going to cost you. If you’re not an author and have joined the dark side as an illustrator it’s probably worth checking out yourself too. The questions were devised and answered by Ginger Nielson who has years of experience in the publishing industry and has created almost 40 children’s books herself.

Visit: How to Hire a Children’s Illustrator

Image Credit… The Waif by Peter George.