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Introducing Comic Artist Brendan Purchase

Wolverine 3

The man, the myth… Nah only kidding! Brendan’s only been working professionally as an illustrator and comic artist for 3 years now. But what makes him worthy of a mention on the LCS is that we’re really digging his style and the offbeat look of his character work. It’s a refreshing change to the over-polished work dished out by the House of Mouse and DC these days. The organic feel and obviously hand drawn look in my opinion (when it comes to comic work) gives the reader more opportunity to use their imagination and really get into the story. Brendan’s style of work only tends to be seen in indy comics, which is a shame really. It’s not as if bodies and the human figure aren’t distorted beyond nature in the mainstream comics and graphic novels, so why can’t comic artists be a bit more loose with their artistic interpretation instead of perpetuating a distorted view of beauty? Anyway! That’s another topic for a whole other conversation. Brendan’s figure work looks bloody awesome and you know the work was done by someone with talent that cares about art.

Check out a bit more of his work below and have a gander at his full portfolio at He specialises in horror and dark imagery and is currently taking on new commissions.





OFFSET London 2015


OFFSET London is just round the corner (November 12th & 13th) and you’ll be glad to know there are a few tickets left, although I can’t see them being available for long. OFFSET London will be a two day event and there will be plenty to do with lots of awesome people to meet. Just be careful not to trip over any hipsters with it being held in Shoreditch Town Hall. :)

With over 2,500 attendees to its Dublin event each year, OFFSET has fast become one of the worlds most inspirational, educational and vocational conferences for the design and creative industries.

Representing industry at all levels, our speakers are key disruptors and influencers in their fields, driving everything from huge global campaigns to awe inspiring personal projects and will speak about their work, ideas and inspirations, giving audiences an insight into their practices and personal perspectives on their careers over the course of the two-day event. – Lisa Haran

You can find more info, tickets and the line up on the official OFFSET London website. It’s a really well run event and definitely worth attending.

Saltopus Halloween Sale!

Saltopus Halloween Sale

We’re pushing the boat out this Halloween with a special spooktacular clearance sale! We have a limited number of our artist tees with 66.6% off and we’ve even discounted some of our most popular t-shirts with 31% off. Stock is limited and once it’s gone, it’s gone.

Visit to nab yourself a bargain! For FREE UK postage as an added bonus use the coupon code: ZOMBIE

Art Business Bootcamp with Marc & Lauren


Marc Scheff and AD Lauren Panepinto of Drawn + Drafted and Dear AD are now accepting sign ups for their Art Business BootCamp! It looks like it’s going to be a fantastic program with invaluable advice for professional freelance illustrators of all levels. Registration closes on the 30th November.

An art career is about more than just making art, it’s about creating a successful business around that work. But the landscape is foggy. There’s no single path. Success looks different for everyone, and we often feel like we’re just spinning our wheels. It can be confusing and emotionally draining. We’ve been there… – Marc & Lauren

You can find out more about the bootcamp at or you can SIGN UP NOW and invest in your future today.

An LCS interview with Paul Shipper


Darren Di Lieto: Paul Shipper is an artist inspired by old school theatrical posters and the movies of the 70’s and 80’s… The hair rock years! Paul’s illustrations have been praised by the likes of J.J. Abrams, Edgar Wright, Simon Pegg, Tom Hanks, Tom Tykwer and the Wachowski’s. Now we are delighted to ask him anything we want!
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Why as a freelancer you shouldn’t work-for-hire!

It’s actually really simple: every time you create a new, original piece of work you own the copyright to it. Instantly. Automatically. You don’t need to apply for it, it’s yours… even if you don’t finish the piece. The main exception is if you become a full-time employee of a company or are working on a licensed character or something similar. But then if you are an in-house illustrator you’ll be entitled to holidays, sick pay, maternity leave, maybe a pension and all the other awesome things you get when you’re an employee rather than being your own boss. In return for those things and a regular wage, as long as you’re not on a zero hour contract and you feel you have job security, I think it’s a fair compromise to give up your copyright and become a work-for-hire cowboy.


Brony, copyright Alex Fine

But when you’re your own boss and you have to cover all those things yourself, why would you give up your copyright? There’s almost never a good reason to sell full rights when you can sell a client a license and save the client a pretty penny in the process. Yes you heard me right, by not selling your copyright to a client you’re saving them money. Take your typical fee (not including full rights) and add 100-150% to it; that’s how much you should be charging for the copyright. If you already include the copyright when you sell an image, you need to half your fee… is that enough? If you don’t think so, you are undercharging for your work, undervaluing yourself and making it more difficult for other hard-working illustrators to charge a proper fee. Not to mention you could be damaging future relationships with your clients when you realise you should have been charging them more. When you quote for a job, never include the copyright and always give the client a few licensing options. If the client does ask for copyright, and you’re willing to sell it, double up your highest quote. They may need it, they may want it, but if that’s the case they should be paying for it.

Some Big Companies at this stage will tell the artist they want to buy or own all copyrights to the image created. For instance, if Disney commissioned me to do an illustration featuring Mickey Mouse, well, they own Mickey Mouse. They would not want me later on licensing the illustration to a company that makes Disney toys for sale with a product, because Disney wants to own and control the Mickey Mouse brand. So, they will without a doubt tell me that working for them means they will purchase the entire copyright from me. This leaves me with no secondary streams of revenue. This usually costs money, and Big Companies typically pay accordingly.
Learning How to Commission Illustration by Randy Gallegos

When you sell a client a license it’s either time-limited or usage-limited or a mixture of both. For example, you might sell an editorial license for a newly commissioned image to a publisher permitting them to only use it in their magazine or on their website as part of a certain article. You’re then free to sell the same image to an apparel company or an advertising company who might use it as part of a motion graphic. But to avoid a conflict where two companies are using the same image at the same time, you might sell the first company an exclusive 12 month license, so although they can still only use it for certain things without paying extra and extending their usage, they’ll be the only ones with the image for 12 months. You can even offer them a renewal when the license expires or offer them a longer license in the first place. Alternatively you might offer them an exclusive perpetual license on using the image in their magazine. They then have it exclusively for a specific usage forever, so why would they want to pay extra for the copyright?

I don’t believe that an illustrator should never sell their copyright. I just think that when they do, they should be paid appropriately for it – and if they don’t, they should be able to bring in a secondary revenue stream from the work they’ve created through additional licensing. Obviously, when an illustrator has more experience they can demand a higher fee for their work, but over time an illustrator’s actual portfolio should gain value too.

If you ever need advice on this subject or any other illustration-related issues, join Hire an Illustrator, then you can email me or Jane directly for help. Or if you just want to get your two pennies worth in on this topic, follow this link and leave a comment on our Facebook page.